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4. Friends School and Learning Differences

Brightbill, David. “How Do Friends Schools Support Students Who Are Struggling Academically?” Institute for Engaging Leadership in Friends Schools 20072009 Action Research (April 2009): 7–8.
David Brightbill surveyed faculty at various Friends schools about the successes of a learning disability program and what changes would need to take place in order for students with learning differences to stay and be successful. He created a handbook for parents, students, and advisers so each knew the expectations of the program.


Gamble, Lisa. “Effectively Teaching Students with Diverse Learning Needs.” Friends Council on Education Leadership Expressions Action Research (April 2015): 10–11.
As of late 2017, Lisa Gamble has implemented a small committee at State College Friends School to support teachers and students. Gamble plans to create a resource library to aid teachers in adapting their classrooms for students with different learning styles.


Smothers, Kirk. “Founding a Quaker Upper School for Students with Learning Disabilities.” Voices of Leadership, Institute for Engaging Leadership in Friends Schools 20092011 Action Research (April 2011): 33–34.
During the process of exploring adding on an upper school to Mary McDowell Friends School, many questions were asked about the necessity of creating another high school for students with learning disabilities in New York; questions were also asked about how the addition of such a school would it affect the current ethos at the school and how such an upper school would be different from what the area’s other schools offered. After finding consensus that it was needed, Kirk Smothers developed one committee to examine graduation requirements and another to find a new facility. As of late 2017, the upper school’s enrollment numbers are growing; however, retention and admission of students are still a challenge.


“Students with Learning Differences: The Quaker Impact.” Chronicles of Quaker Education (Spring 1999): 1–3.
This article notes how Quakerism is committed to equality and acceptance, and it examines how Quaker schools, specifically Delaware Valley Friends School, can accommodate students who have learning differences by teaching various study styles and providing tools to boost self-confidence via respect and honor.

Chapters

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1
The Rise of Quaker Education & Early Schools

CHAPTER 2
Quaker Pedagogy: A Moral Approach to Experiential Learning

CHAPTER 3
Diversity in Friends Schools

CHAPTER 4
Friends School & Learning Differences

CHAPTER 5
Friends School Leadership

CHAPTER 6
Friends School Governance

CHAPTER 7
Meeting for Worship

CHAPTER 8
Friends School Culture

Quaker Education: A Source Book - version 1

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